Browsing All posts tagged under »The Conversation«

Can, or rather do, academics ever retire?

January 8, 2017

0

Topical, especially given Ron Corso, my Unearthing Ideas colleague, frequently questioning this of himself. We doubt he will however, as Simon says in his article republished below, “Academic work becomes rapidly vocational. You quickly realise that you live to work, far more than you are working to live. When you publish work that you find […]

Republished; Simple thinking in a complex world is a recipe for disaster

January 5, 2017

0

In an era of post-truth and pseudoscience, what can you do? Our "LifeFlip" initiative - which is using the "Afternoon Conversations with Ron" to tease out some of the complexities we face as we age in particular, is one way we are working to improve our world. In particular,‘Life Flip’ is the exploration of what our life will look like as contributing and valuable citizens in our later years ie past the 60+ of typical retirement.

Republished; How to be a healthy user of social media

January 3, 2017

0

How to be a healthy user of social media Peggy Kern, University of Melbourne We can learn a lot about people through how they use social media. For example, Twitter language can be used to predict the risk of dying from heart disease. Analyses of Facebook updates show women tend to be warmer than men, […]

Republished; 2016, the year that was: Arts and Culture

January 1, 2017

0

Great article wrap up 2016, the year that was: Arts and Culture Suzy Freeman-Greene, The Conversation 2016 was not a good year to be a famous male musician. In January, David Bowie died at just 69. He was mourned by pretty much everyone, including the German Foreign Office, which tweeted: “You are now among Heroes”. […]

Global journalism needs global ethics

July 26, 2016

0

Replublished Christopher Kremmer, UNSW Australia There’s an old saying in journalism: “All news is local”. It means that news, wherever it comes from, needs to engage the interest of its local audience if it is to succeed. But read today’s paper, or turn to the nightly television news broadcast, or just check your phone right […]

What happens when middle schoolers take to Twitter? They become learners

June 12, 2016

0

They share, "Based on this Twitter project with middle schoolers and Becker’s subsequent doctoral research with high school students, we found students learned through Twitter in multiple ways."

If this is the Facebook election, the major parties should be a little concerned

June 12, 2016

0

If Facebook is a microcosm of wider electoral feeling, Turnbull has work to do. But the main message from Facebook is that, between them, the nation’s two main political leaders are “liked” online by less than 2.5% of eligible voters.

How social media is changing the church

May 10, 2016

0

Republished from The Conversation Bex Lewis, Manchester Metropolitan University Over the Easter weekend, the Church of England encouraged its congregation to share photos of their services and celebrations on social media using the hashtag #EasterJoy. It’s not strange for a large organisation to interact with its members and promote its message in this way. But […]

#ausvotes Revisited: Social Media in the 2013 Australian Federal Election

May 9, 2016

0

Republished from The Conversation Axel Bruns, Queensland University of Technology As Australia commences one of the longest federal election campaigns in living memory, much attention will be paid again to how parties and politicians are utilising the latest tools available in their campaigning arsenal: social media. We’ve seen Facebook and Twitter used as emerging campaigning […]

Please ‘like’ me: why Facebook might be the key to success in the 2016 election

May 9, 2016

0

Republished from The Conversation Andrea Carson, University of Melbourne Another big week in federal politics is underway, with the budget announced on Tuesday. Then, possibly this weekend, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will formally call a double-dissolution election for July 2. While it is true that the official campaign does not begin until the governor-general issues […]

Why we all need to keep up with the Kardashians

March 11, 2016

3

RePublished from by Meredith Jones, Brunel University London Kimposium!, an academic symposium I organised about all things Kardashian, sold out. And why would it not, given the levels of interest that this family generates? But there is some dismay at the idea of academic attention being paid to these celebrities. It seems that some people love […]

Who benefits from media reform? If history is any guide, it’s not the public

March 11, 2016

0

RePublished from by Vincent O’Donnell, RMIT University The “most significant media reform in Australia in a generation”, as unveiled by Communications Minister Mitch Fifield earlier this month, is no reform. It is a capitulation to the interests of licensees, shareholders and rent-seekers in the Australian media industries, painted up in the gaudy raiment of the protection […]

Connecting online can help prevent social isolation in older people

December 2, 2015

0

Jenny Waycott, University of Melbourne John*, a widower, is a retired engineer aged in his 90s. He lives alone in the family home and has struggled with loneliness and depression since his wife passed away. He feels frustrated that as he gets older he can no longer do many of the things he used to […]

Keep an eye on vocal fry – it’s all about power, status and gender

November 5, 2015

0

Cate Madill, University of Sydney Much has been written about vocal fry in recent years, with the focus on what it is, where it comes from and what it means. For those who don’t know, the term refers to the lowest vocal register, where the vocal cords are tightly closed for a very long time […]